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owl sitting on a fence pole wings open. background is a blurry meadow
photography by Jordan Rudeen, used with permission: @jordanrudeenphoto

Meditations on Teaching and Learning in the Time of Covid


The third collection of the Writing for Change Journal broadly captures what it has meant to teach and learn during the pandemic, and the myriad of ways we have been agents of change during the last two and a half years. Vulnerable, imaginative, and at times confrontational and provocative, these pages demonstrate newfound capabilities to grow, and previously unrealized capacities to change. This collection begins from the assumption that what we have learned and what we have taught others in the face of unprecedented challenges reveals our strength and resilience, and ultimately our belief in a better world, a world that reflects our becoming.

 

 

 

The Writing for Change Journal is a multimodal publishing space, and therefore welcomes submissions beyond traditional written texts like essays and other forms of nonfiction writing like prose, interviews, and personal narratives. Submissions may also be in the form of photography, visual and performance art, podcasts, film, and combined mediums and those yet to be imagined. Though we may ask you to include a paragraph or two about your process and intention as it relates to this collection’s theme. Creative and collaborative submissions are always welcomed.

 


Call for submissions is open until November 13, 2022

Break the Ice (before it melts)

“So I tell you this not to scare you,

But to prepare you, to dare you

To dream a different reality.”

From Amanda Gorman’s poem, “Earthrise”

The fourth collection of the Writing for Change Journal centers on the most significant and wide-reaching form of change that there is today: climate change. We are interested in submissions that reflect the nuanced ways we experience climate change, how we think about impact, and how our research and daily experiences of climate change enrich our collective understanding and responsibility. We all share the planet, and when we share our experiences, we uncover new ways to find connections with each other. Our hope for this collection is that it depicts a snapshot of this uncertain historic moment that is diverse in both perspective and method of communication and reflection, from the hopeful and inspirational to the dreadful and traumatic, from mitigation strategies to adaptation, this collection promises to be one rooted in the experiences of those who live in our shared region.

See the full call-for-submissions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a crowd with their fists up holding posters protesting peacefully
Taken in the summer of 2020 from the capitol steps in downtown Boise during a widely attended rally for racial justice in the wake of the murder of George Floyd. Picture Credit: Fiona Montagne (see more of Fiona’s photography in Collection #1)